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Newsletter: Curiosity, then questions

(Volume 1, Issue 17)


Topic of the week: Curiosity, then questions

Self-inquiry is a skill that contributes to growth, professionally and personally. It's more about curiosity than analysis. But the starting point is the intent, then comes the questions.


Recently, I have come across several lists of questions compiled by others that prompt one to consider one's own values, priorities and objectives. These are a great thought starters to compose one's own list of questions that prompt curiosity, self-inquiry and exploration.

Answers may change over time. That's the beauty of growth.

Quote of the week

"True happiness is to enjoy the present, without anxious dependence upon the future, not to amuse ourselves with either hopes or fears but to rest satisfied with what we have.“

— Seneca

Three recent articles


1. Vitaliy Kastelnelson is CEO of Investment Management Associates based in Denver, Colorado. He is a prolific writer on a range of topics beyond investment management on his blog, Contrarian Edge. Recently he has organized his prior writings into a free introductory course on value investing, which is a great resource.


2. McKinsey & Co posted an article about five characteristics of durable business platforms. The five characteristics (1. Clear ownership, 2. Well designed processes, 3. Automation, 4. Performance measurement, 5. Mindset and communication) apply not only to business platforms but to any initiative.


3. Ray Dalio's Principles is recommended reading (see our reading list). His recent post on how to get anything you want underscores how the two ingredients to get anything you want are open-mindedness and determination.


From the archive


Posts on Related Perspectives that you may have missed:

  1. Work with emotions instead of against them

  2. Play in traffic

  3. Assertive communication (the DESO framework)

  4. Book review: Unleashed

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